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We have put this page together to assist our customers with understanding some of the commonly used satellite related terms, meanings and definitions!  This is by no means an official dictionary of terms!

Commissioning: In relationship to most HughesNet Satellite Internet Equipment, Systems and Services, the term “commissioning” is the process of entering your HughesNet Site Account Number (SAN) and Personal ID Number (PIN) into the HughesNet modem in order to activate your monthly service for obtaining Internet access!  This is typically done from an Internet browser (Internet Explorer is recommended for all HughesNet applications) by first visiting a web page built into the HughesNet Modem.  That page is located at http://192.168.0.1/fs/registration/setup.html and selecting the “Registration-Installer” link! The HughesNet HN9000, HT1000, HT1100 and other modems use a similar process, however it’s not identical to this process!

Contentions / Contention Ratio:  Definition Coming Soon!

Crosspole / Cross-pole:  Definition Coming Soon!

DAPT, DAPT 2:  The DAPT is a tool designed to assist the installer with pointing a Ku Band or Ka Band HughesNet Satellite Dish.  The DAPT replaced the OPI (outdoor pointing interface) that only worked for Ku Band Direcway and HughesNet systems (when used with the optional 22khz filter!  The DAPT also worked with the HN9000 and other Ka band systems.  The newer DAPT 2 replaced the DAPT by adding and audio speaker to assist in pointing the even newer Ka Band Jupiter Gen 4 Satellite Internet Systems!  The OPI, DAPT and DAPT 2 plug into the receive cable out at the antenna and display the same signal strength that is being displayed on the modem!  This allows the installer an easy method for rough pointing and fine tuning the HughesNet Satellite Dish.  The HN9000 and newer systems require optional squinters for the final pointing and testing process!

Fair Access Policy, FAP:  Definition Coming Soon!

Isolation: Definition Coming Soon!

Registration:  In relationship to most HughesNet Satellite Internet Equipment, Systems and Services, the term “registration” is the process of registering your satellite Internet account within your satellite Internet modem (HN7000s, etc.) and registering your account with HughesNet or the HughesNet service provider so that you can activate your account and access your account and payment information, set up e-mail accounts, purchase FAP tokens, view support pages, and update your billing / payment information and more!  Once your HughesNet HN7000s modem is commissioned through the Registration & Commissioning Process, you can register your account by going to the HughesNet Customer Care site at http://customercare.myhughesnet.com/.  The HughesNet HN9000, HT1000, HT1100 and other modems use a similar process, however it’s not identical to this process!

Force Ranging:  Force-ranging is a term commonly related to HughesNet Satellite Internet Equipment, Systems and Services!  A “force-ranging” process is used to obtain fresh T&D data (time & distance to satellite).  During a ranging process, HughesNet recalculates and resets transmission power levels, requirements and rate codes during the range.  This process helps your HughesNet system to achieve and optimized connection to the satellite, assuming the system is pointed correctly and properly peaked! The HughesNet HN9000, HT1000, HT1100 and other modems use a similar process, however it’s not identical to this process!

Rate Code: Rate Code is a term commonly related to HughesNet Satellite Internet Equipment, Systems and Services!  The rate code is visible in the advanced system page at http://192.168.0.1/fs/advanced/advanced.html.  For example, take a rate code of 256k 2/3. The 256k is the symbol rate. The 2/3 ratio following the symbol rate is an inverse of the redundancy rate, in this case 3 bits for 2. That means three bits are sent for every two bits of data, the third bit being an exact copy of one of the two data bits. The redundant bit is there in case the associated data bit gets corrupted somehow enroute. It’s important to note that the 256 is a symbol rate, as it explains why you’ll never actually see yourself transmitting at 256k. One third of the bits are overhead, making your actual transmit max data rate something less than 171k. Using this as a model then, 512 4/5 is a symbol rate of 512 resulting from FEC 4/5. One redundant bit is sent for every four – less error correction, but more data rate. This allows users to send up to a max of almost 410k. The less redundant rate codes are typically employed during fair weather. When errors are encountered – typically during a rainstorm – the modem is designed to “range down” to a more redundant rate; more correction/less data. That’s why your transmit will observably slow down during times of poor propagation, but not necessarily die completely. So in the end, forced ranging itself has nothing to do with the Rate Code. But after completion, the subsequent network recovery process includes determining the currently opportune Rate Code.  Rate codes are improved by proper pointing and peaking of the HughesNet Satellite Dish Antenna. The HughesNet HN9000, HT1000, HT1100 and other modems use a similar process, however it’s not identical to this process!

Throughput / Thru-put: Definition Coming Soon!